GreenStyle Jillian Tank

Powernet “Colorblocking” And A Hidden Seam Pocket

I love sewing workout wear for several reasons.  First of all, I need something to wear to yoga class.  Secondly, I am far too frugal to spend $50 or more on a cute workout top.  And last but not least, I can customize my makes to suit my style and color preferences.

I have had the vision of a white workout top with powernet inserts floating around in my head for a while.  I just hadn’t gotten around to sewing one up.  Enter the GreenStyle Jillian Tank (on sale for 15% off as a May 2019 “Pattern of the Month”). 🙂   The pattern is loaded with options: a bandeau top; an inner tank, with or without a built in sports bra; and an outer tank that can be made with knit or woven fabric.  I chose to make the inner tank with a built in sports bra.

I used white Supplex and white Powernet from Phee Fabrics to make my Jillian Tank.  I like the simple design of the Jillian inner tank, because it gives the powernet inserts the opportunity to stand out.  Adding inserts is really easy, it’s basically a simple color blocking technique.  I cut two right angle triangles out of my powernet, being sure to cut them straight on the grain, with the greatest stretch going side to side.  The sides of the L part of the triangles were 7″ long.  I laid the triangles on the bottom corner of the tank front, and trimmed off the excess powernet to match the shape of the corners.

Jillian triangle

I marked the tank front 6.25″ up and 6.25″ over from the bottom corner and using my quilting ruler and rotary cutter, cut off the (smaller sized) triangles from the bottom corners of my tank front.  Then I laid the powernet triangles on the tank front right sides together and stitched them together.  I pressed the seam allowances toward the Supplex and top-stitched them in place so that you wouldn’t see them through the powernet.

Jillian power

I like to walk the beach whenever I get the chance.  Since I don’t want to have to carry my phone and keys, I need pockets.  I put pockets in all my workout tights and shorts, but occasionally, I’ll find myself wearing something without pockets.  So why not start adding pockets to my workout tops?  A hidden seam pocket gives cleaner lines than a patch pocket, not to mention how much easier it is to keep straight while sewing!

I cut a 4.5″ wide by 8″ tall rectangle out of powernet.  I made it that large to ensure that my phone would stay snugly in place, yet still be able to reach in and grab a key or lip balm from the bottom of the pocket.  I folded the top of the pocket down and stitched it in place.  Then I laid the pocket right sides together 3.75″ from the right edge of the tank back at the bottom corner.  I stitched along the right hand side of the pocket.

Jillian pock 1

Then I flipped the pocket over and basted it along the side seam, and zig-zagged it in place along the bottom of the pocket.  (Had I cut the pocket a bit longer, I would have lined it up with the bottom of the tank and just basted it in place.)  When the tank is hemmed, the bottom of the pocket is securely sewn in place.

Jillian pock 2

After these simple modifications, I just followed the pattern tutorial to complete my tank.  I made another small adjustment to the pattern out of necessity.  The pattern calls for double straps threaded through the top of the front shoulder strap.   Rather than cutting and sewing the straps, I used plush bra strap elastic to speed up my sewing time. Since my strapping was wider than the sewn straps would have been, I went with a single strap.

Jillian back

I love having a solid white workout top to mix and match with my Super G‘s.  The powernet inserts and pocket give the simple lines a little extra pizazz.

Jillian G frontJillian G side

I can style it with a skirt or shorts for a completely different look.

Jillian hand

I could see myself using this simple color-blocking technique to add in coordinating fabrics if I were trying to match workout tights with color-blocked side panels.  The hidden seam pocket can be customized to fit whatever you want to carry.  It’s so much more useful than the tiny little key pockets you find on ready to wear!

Go ahead and sew all the workout wear!  After all, it is #memademay.

 

*This post may contain affiliate links.  This means that at no extra cost to you, I may receive a small commission if you purchase through my links.  As always, I only give my honest opinion.  After all, it is my blog, which represents me!  Thank you for reading and sharing my love of sewing and pattern hacking. 😉

5oo4 Zen Pants Made As Shorts

And An Internal Patch Pocket Hack

Summer time means shorts, and nothing screams summer like bright, white shorts.  They look great with any color tank or tee, or thrown on over a swimsuit.  In my quest to use every pattern in my collection I decided to try the 5 Out Of 4 Patterns Zen Pants, using the shorts cut line.  The Zen Pants are a slim fit with optional front and back patch pockets and a side cargo pocket.  There is also an optional faux fly, and drawstring waistband.

I like my shorts to be a smooth line under my tanks and wanted a dressy casual look, so I wanted to streamline as much as possible.  Pockets are an absolute necessity, so I decided to turn the large patch pockets into smaller internal patch pockets, and to forego any other ornamentation.  It’s fun to customize patterns to suit my needs, and I’m never afraid to try a simple hack.  As I have noted before, I don’t show full pattern pieces to protect designers intellectual property.

The first step of altering the pocket was to decide how wide I wanted it.  I laid my phone on the pattern pocket piece and knew that I could slim it down to the width of the X-small pocket.  I laid my traced out pants front piece onto the master pattern pocket and used a pencil to draw lines from the hip up and from the top out to the outer top corner.  I also curved the pocket side to follow the curve of the hip on the pants front.  I am pointing to this area in the photo below.  (The dashed line is the original pattern shape of the outer top corner of the pocket.)

Z pocket alter

Laying the pants front on the master pattern pocket piece allowed me to trace the curve to make the pocket opening on the pants front.  That small piece in the upper corner of the photo below is the piece I cut off and discarded.  I also hacked the pocket facing, (which is used to reinforce the pocket opening.)  I like my pocket facings to be about an inch wide, so I traced the top curve of the pocket facing piece and just made it an inch wide.

Z pocket fac

Next I laid out all my pattern pieces and cut them out my fabric.  You could use a ponte or one of the other recommended fabrics, but I find that shorts made of ponte make me feel too hot and sweaty.  I love making my shorts out of Supplex.  It’s moisture wicking, so it really helps keep you cool.  And since it washes and wears so well, you don’t have to worry about using white Supplex to make shorts (or anything else for that matter!)  Because I love the consistently high quality, I buy all of my Supplex from Phee Fabrics.  It is a substantial 18oz., so I never have to worry about it being sheer.  And, it took less than a yard of fabric for my shorts.

Place the pocket facing on the pocket opening right sides together, stitch, then flip the facing to the inside of the pocket.  Give it a good press, then topstitch.  The photo below shows what the facing will look like on the inside (or wrong) side.

Z pocket

Place the pocket right side up, to the wrong side of the shorts front, lining up the top and sides.  Baste at the top and side seam, and pin the curved inner edge of the pocket to the front.

Z pocket baste

Use a zig zag, decorative stitch, or cover stitch to sew the pocket to the front.  I used one of the “overlock” stitches on my sewing machine.  Take your time sewing around the curve to make sure you are catching the pocket as you sew.  Press everything smooth.  From this point you’ll be able follow the pattern directions as written to finish your shorts or pants.
Zen back

I like the idea of the back yoke/waistband on the Zen Pants, because it curves down to meet the pockets at the side seams and gives your shorts or pants a flattering shaped look.  It does however take longer to sew than a simple rectangular or a contoured waistband that’s even along the bottom edge.  I also like that the pattern tutorial gives you photos, drawings, and tips for some common pants fitting issues.  I may try to scoop out the back crotch curve of my shorts a little to fit the shape of my bum.  This should correct the wrinkles I seem to get on all pants patterns, (so I know that it’s my body shape, versus an issue with patterns.)

I love being able to make cute, comfortable shorts that will help keep me cool during the heat of summer.  It’s nice to be able to customize them to suit me by choosing from all the pattern options and by a simple hack for the pockets.

 
Zen shorts

Now I need to search through my patterns to see what else I need to make!

 

*This post may contain affiliate links.  This means that at no extra cost to you, I may receive a small commission if you purchase through my links.  As always, I only give my honest opinion.  After all, it is my blog, which represents me!  Thank you for reading and sharing my love of sewing and pattern hacking. 😉

My GreenStyle Fit Capsule Roundup

Sew All The Workout Wear!

I’ll start off with my newest makes from earlier this week.  Before I spent three days helping my Mom and before I ended up with the flu. 😦  I knew I had to get my sewing fix in before I left for my Mom’s, so I made a couple things I really wanted and needed.

My love for Super G’s is strong, so I made a pair in navy Supplex with navy powernet pocket panels.  As soon as these new colors were listed on the Phee Fabrics website, I had to place an order!  Navy is a great basic, so I will wear these a lot.  Since I always find myself reaching for a Studio To Street Top when I get chilly, I decided to make another one in Phee’s pretty periwinkle rayon spandex.  I did the V-neck, V-back, curved hem version, except I cut it straight across in the front, and did a 4-1/2″ split hem on the bottom sides.  This kept it a little bit longer in the front, and gave me a cleaner, (though similar look) to the split band version I made previously.

STS peri navy Super GSince it’s not a capsule without at least three pieces, here’s my flat lay photo that includes my Brassie Jogger shorts.  If I have enough Supplex left in any other colors, I plan to make more Brassie shorts because they are seriously the most comfortable shorts ever!  It’s a bummer that I couldn’t capture the true colors with my indoor photo.
navy peri fit cap

My Lille Tank and Norah Nightgown mash-up was the anchor for my teal and charcoal Supplex capsule.  I used powernet in the front and back bodice, as well as for the pocket panels on my Super G’s.  And look, it’s another pair of Brassie shorts!

Lille Nteal charcoal fit cap

Plum Supplex and neon green tricot made such a striking combo for my Power Sports Bra and Super G’s.  I rounded out my capsule with a plum Supplex Lille.  Because it’s a solid, I’ll be able to mix and match it with items in my other capsules.

 

Lille outtakeGS bra sideplum neon fit cap

Hacking the Power Sports Bra into a workout top was my first Fit Capsule item.  And it looks great with my gray Supplex Super G’s.  Of course I need to include one of my comfortable rayon spandex Studio To Street Tops to round out this final capsule.

top jumpgray white fit cap

All in all, I have really enjoyed sewing for the Fit Capsule Challenge.  It pushed me to expand my workout wardrobe and to finish up some pieces that I know will get tons of wear.  Here’s hoping that I can get over this flu and get back to yoga on Monday!

 

*This post may contain affiliate links.  This means that at no extra cost to you, I may receive a small commission if you purchase through my links.  As always, I only give my honest opinion.  After all, it is my blog, which represents me!  Thank you for reading and supporting my love of sewing!

 

GreenStyle Super G Tights

Workout Wear Within A Yard

I like yoga.  I love sewing.  Combine these two statements and the logical conclusion is sewing workout wear.  If you’ve looked through an Athleta catalog, or wandered through Lululemon or any other high-end workout wear store, you have probably been a little taken aback by the prices.  There is some justification to their price because high quality performance fabric isn’t cheap.  And you want fabric that is anti-microbial and moisture wicking if you’re planning to work up a sweat while working out.  However, $98.00 yoga tights aren’t within my budget, and the fabric isn’t that expensive!

I go to yoga 4 or 5 times a week, so I need a lot of workout wear.  I’ve made workout leggings out of swim and “Loungeletics” fabric from JoAnn Fabrics, and they are cute and comfortable at first.  But the fabric gets a bit baggy and stretched out after wearing them all day.  And they certainly aren’t moisture wicking.  Which brings me to Supplex from Phee Fabrics.  This is the high quality fabric that the high end stores use for their workout wear.  It is 18 oz./linear yard (400 grams per square meter)!  It holds everything in place, and has wonderful 4-way stretch with excellent recovery.

I recently bought the GreenStyle Creations Super G Tights pattern and was excited to add a new style into my rotation.  I chose the Super G’s because there is a side panel with pocket option.  And we all know that pockets are life! 🙂  Especially pockets that are big enough to hold a large phone in a sturdy case.  I like capri length workout tights because I live in Florida, and Ashtanga yoga is sweaty!  The Super G’s have a gusset that gives the tights excellent stretch and flexibility without irritating seams in sensitive areas.

However, the gusset pattern piece is longer than 36 inches, and I was working with a yard of fabric.  I turned this potential problem into a design element by color blocking my fabric about 3″ at both ends of my gusset piece.  It gave me a fun triangle accent on the inside of my calves.  I used white powernet for the color-blocking and side pocket panels.  It gives my legs a little bit of ventilation as well as being a great accent.

I added an inch to the rise of my tights because I am tall and a little curvy.  Could I have gotten away without the extra inch?  Absolutely!  But I’m sure I’m not the only one who likes a little extra coverage on the tummy!  I also decide to curve in the center back seam a little bit before adding the waistband.  I made sure to alter my pattern piece for future use.

super g cb seamsuper g cb alter

I took larger seam allowances on the contoured waistband to make it a bit smaller as well.  Adjusting patterns to suit your body shape is one of the reasons we sew.  We can customize the fit, and design fabric and color combos that work for us.  The simple gray and white color scheme of my workout tights means that they will match nearly every workout top I own.  And since I only used a yard of Supplex, they are well within my budget!

fold super g
warrior super g

If you haven’t tried yoga, I encourage you to try a class or two.  It’s not only great exercise, but the steady breathing helps bring calmness and focus into your life.  And if you haven’t tried sewing workout wear, give it a shot!  The Super G Tights are a great pattern, and Supplex is a wonderful fabric.  You’ll end up with workout wear that looks like a hundred bucks, but costs you a whole lot less.  And it’ll probably fit you better too!

super g

Now I need to make some strappy workout tops out of Supplex (and perhaps some Tricot).  This ready to wear top with sleeves was way too hot for yoga class!  What is your favorite workout pattern?

 

*This post may contain affiliate links.  This means that at no extra cost to you, I may receive a small commission if you purchase through my links.  As always, I only give my honest opinion.  After all, it is my blog, which represents me!  Thank you for reading and supporting my love of sewing!

P4P SOS Pants Contoured Waistband

Long Distance Pattern Hacking

I received a text from my daughter, “Mom, you’ve completely ruined me for regular leggings!  It’s so much more convenient to have pants with pockets.”  Hahahaha, so true!  I’ve made her Patterns for Pirates Peg Legs with the side panel, pockets and contoured waistband, as well as the SOS (skinny or straight) Pants which have pockets.  While she likes the SOS skinnies, they are a bit too low rise for her comfort.  But she does like the dressier look and convenience of four pockets.

I had ordered some Twill Polartec Powerstretch from Phee Fabrics because it sounded like an interesting fabric, and I thought I would make myself some cute pants or joggers.  But since my daughter actually needed new pants (and I really don’t!) I knew the Twill Powerstretch would be perfect for SOS Pants.

I’ve seen comments on the P4P Facebook group page that the SOS Pants pattern is being updated, but it’s cold now, so I went ahead and cut out her pants.  I decided that making a contoured waistband would be the simplest way to change the rise for her.  It would be easier for me if she lived nearby so that I could measure her, make a waistband, have her try it on, and alter as necessary before attaching it to the pants.  But since she and her family live in another state, I just went with her measurements and requests.

She wanted the pants three inches higher in front and one inch higher in back.  The P4P Peg Legs add-on pattern has a contoured waistband, but are designed with much more negative ease than SOS Pants.  It is a good reference though, to help visualize how to make a contoured waistband.  I laid the pocket on the pants front, and the back yoke on the pants back pattern pieces to help me figure out my waistband shape.

SOS pattern

That helped me get the bottom curved shape of my waistband pieces.  The SOS Pants pattern calls for a 5″ high rectangular piece, which when folded over and sewn gives you a 2″ tall waistband.  Note: I like to use a 3/8″ seam allowance on the waistband, rather than the 1/2″ the pattern calls for, so add 1/4″ to my measurements below if you want to stick to 1/2″ seams.  Since my daughter wanted the front 3″ taller, I made the center front of the waistband 5-3/4″ tall.  She wanted the back 1″ taller, so I made the center back 3-3/4″ tall.  I tapered both pieces to 4-3/4″ tall at the side seams.

Since you are not folding over like a standard waistband you will need to cut out two front and two back waistband pieces on the fold.  One set will be your main waistband and one will be your waistband lining.  I sewed up the pants per the pattern directions, then sewed on the new contoured waistband and sent the pants off to my daughter.

Jen SOS waistJen SOS side

Ta Da!  SOS skinny pants with a contoured waistband and pockets galore!  It’s just what a busy wife and Mama needs.  You can use this hack on other pants patterns as long as you use a quality knit fabric with appropriate stretch and recovery.  I recommend trying your waistband on and making any tweaks before you sew it onto your pants.  Unless of course you are mailing the pants to another state like I did!  🙂

Happy sewing and hacking!

 

*This post may contain affiliate links.  This means that at no extra cost to you, I may receive a small commission if you purchase through my links.  As always, I only give my honest opinion.  After all, it is my blog, which represents me!  Thank you for reading and supporting my love of sewing!

Phone Sized Pockets

Because Pockets Are Life!

GreenStyle Creations Brassie Joggers are a quick sew with a comfortable fit.  But they have a small problem- modern technology!  Most women will comment about clothing that “Pockets are life!”  Ready to wear women’s clothing rarely has pockets.  Or if they do, they are tiny little decorative pockets.  About the only RTW clothing item that consistently has pockets are denim jeans.  Real women need pockets!

Menswear has pockets, and I get it that men have to carry wallets, and most women carry purses.  But you can’t carry your purse around all day.  When I go for a walk, I take a house key and my phone (and my water bottle, I get thirsty!)  So I need pockets for my stuff.  And if you have little ones, pockets are a necessity.  “Mama, look at this pretty rock.  Hold it for me.”  Toy cars, snacks, rocks and sticks, you name it, Mama is expected to carry it in her pocket.

The real necessity of course, is your cell phone.  Modern technology has conditioned us to feel lost without our mini-computer.  And if you prefer a larger screen so you can see all those cute photos on your Facebook feed, forget it!  That phone isn’t going to fit in most pockets.  And adding a phone case makes it even more of a challenge to fit.

The Brassie Jogger pocket is a decent size, it just doesn’t feel deep enough to hold my phone securely.  Altering the pocket may sound challenging, but really, it’s an easy modification.  The opening at the top of pocket pieces is around six inches, to give you room to take your hand (and stuff) in and out of the pocket.  So however you alter the shape of the opening, you need to maintain that six inch opening.

Brassie alter

I wanted the pocket opening to start about two inches higher than it does.  The purple pocket edge line shows the original shape.  I lined the pocket pattern piece up under the pants front to maintain the proper hip curve.  Then I took my measuring tape, held one end two inches up from the original spot and curved it up toward the waist.  I maintained the six inch opening for my hand, and traced my new pocket opening.  The new opening is shown in turquoise.

Since I also wanted a higher rise (I am tall, and low or mid-rise pants don’t fit well) I added an inch at the top of my pattern pieces.  The pattern currently has layers for low and mid-rise.  I think I’ve read that GreenStyle plans to update the pattern to add a higher rise, but I want to make this pattern now.  I could have used the slash and spread method to add an inch to the rise, but adding it at the top worked.  Bonus- it also made the pocket an inch deeper!

I also traced my new pocket curve onto my fabric and made a one inch wide pocket facing.  I prefer a facing to just turning the top edge under and stitching.  I think it adds crispness and stability to your pockets.  I lengthened the inseam of my shorts to six inches, as it’s a good length for me.  Other than these simple modifications, I simply followed the pattern directions.

Brassie pocket

When Phee Fabrics started carrying Polartec, I wanted to try some.  It is an interesting fabric, NOT the bulky polar fleece stuff you might be visualizing.  It’s a technical anti-microbial fabric with a moisture wicking “power grid”.

tech-diagram-power-dry.jpg

The power grid design also makes it super easy to see your grainline and ensure that you are laying out your pattern pieces properly!
power grain

The Polartec Powerdry fabric is lightweight and breathable, so I knew that I would be able to make cute and comfortable shorts out of it.  I hope I have enough of this fabric left to make some joggers or lounge pants, because it is comfortable!

If you’re interested, the top I am wearing is made of Phee Fabrics rayon/spandex using the P4P Essential Tank pattern with the curved hemline.

Brassie tank

So go ahead and add some pockets to your life! 🙂

 

*This post may contain affiliate links.  This means that at no extra cost to you, I may receive a small commission if you purchase through my links.  As always, I only give my honest opinion.  After all, it is my blog, which represents me!  Thank you for reading and supporting my love of sewing!