Mashing Patterns To Suit Your Body And Style

People sometimes comment in Facebook sewing groups that they can’t find a pattern that they like, or they want a certain style for the top, but a different look for the bottom.  Do you have patterns with certain elements that you absolutely love, and wish that you could mix and match them with elements from a different pattern?  Have you ever tried mashing those patterns together to give you a new look?  I find myself mashing and hacking patterns all the time.  It’s generally a good idea to make the pattern as designed at least once, to judge how it fits and looks on you.  Once you know how it fits, it’s easier to start playing with your patterns.

A pattern mash can be something as simple as using the contour waistband you love from your favorite workout pants on a different pants or shorts pattern.  I use a modified version of the Patterns for Pirates Peg Legs contoured waistband on P4P SOS Pants and it works great, blogged here.  Mixing and mashing sports bras with workout tanks can really personalize your gym wardrobe.  Like using the GreenStyle Power Sports Bra and mashing it with the body of the GS Lille or Jillian Tank to make a workout top.  It’s always fun to turn a top into a dress, like using the Stitch Upon A Time Aushui Tank and mashing it with the skirt of the Calista Bra, Top, Tunic & Dress.

Sometimes your mash will require a little bit of adjustment in order to work.  Like tracing the armscye from a pattern onto another pattern to ensure that the sleeves you want to use will fit the jacket, top, or dress.  Sometimes it’s a matter of making your best guess as to what will work, then trying it on and adjusting from there.

That was my  experience with last week’s pattern mash.  I wanted another new dress, and loved the flared skirt from the Sinclair Yasmin Dress.  Temperatures are still in the 90’s here, so a strappy dress seemed in order.  The Stitch Upon A Time Water Faery Twist & Swim Top (blogged here) fits well, so I figured that mashing the plain front version with the Yasmin skirt would make a super cute dress.  And I think it does.  But it took a little bit of basting and trying on to perfect my fit.  I knew that the V-shaped waistband from the Yasmin wasn’t going to line up with the bodice of the Water Faery, so I cut out the crop length Water Faery body to use as a waistband.  Since it’s technically designed as a swim top, the body is quite fitted, so that it won’t float or ride up when you go in the water.  Since I don’t plan to swim in my dress, I want the waistband fitted, but not too form-fitted.  Since I’ve been known to bake (and thoroughly enjoy indulging in) apple crisp this time of year, I decided to size up one on the “waistband”. 😉

Knowing how a pattern fits, and taking note of any changes you make to the pattern really helps the next time you make it.  When I made the Water Faery into a workout top, I narrowed and lengthened the straps and liked it, so this time I knew that cutting out strips 3″ wide & 14″ long would give me the perfect finished size.  Sewing up the bodice (which is an inner and outer layer of Phee Fabrics Tricot, with a layer of powernet sandwiched between) and straps was pretty quick and easy, and the fit was spot on.  Since I hate seam ripping, I just basted the “waistband” pieces together, and tried it on.  It was too loose under the bust.  So I graded the front waistband piece from my measured size at the top, and somewhat straight down, rather than angling in which gave me more of a rectangular rather than tapered shape.  With the width figured out, I stitched the side seams together and basted the outer waistband to the bodice, right sides together.  Then I pinned the inner waistband to the inside, effectively making an enclosed waistband.  It’s easier for me to keep all of the layers perfectly lined up by basting one layer on before pinning on the other layer and stitching everything together.  Before folding the waistband pieces down into place, I zigzagged 1″ wide elastic to the seam allowance, using the length recommended for my size in the Water Faery pattern.  This ensures that the waistband and skirt will stay down under the bust.

Then it was time to determine how long the waistband needed to be.  I wanted the flared skirt to start right at the natural waist.  Starting the flare at the narrowest part of the body gives the illusion of an hourglass shape.  My natural waist is quite high, pretty much right at the bottom of my ribs, well above my belly button.  It was surprisingly easy to find the perfect spot.  Since the waistband also had powernet sandwiched between the layers, it was definitely going to find the narrowest point for me!  Literally just bending side to side, forward and back, caused the waistband to roll up to the height of my natural waist.  I used my hem gauge to take note of the fact that the waist seam needed to be 1″ up from the bottom of the waistband in the back and on the sides, tapering to 1-3/4″ up in the center front.  Since I prefer using 3/8″ seam allowances, I trimmed 5/8″ off the back waistband pattern piece.  I used a ruler to taper from 5/8″ at the sides to 1-3/8″ at center front on the front waistband pattern piece.  Then I very carefully matched up the side seams of my bodice,  lined up the bottom edges, pinned the bodice together so that the center front and center back were on the two outside edges, and used my rotary cutter to trim off the excess fabric.

Adding the skirt was super simple, sew up the two side seams, match center points and side seams, pin all around, and stitch.  The most time consuming part was pinning up the hem.  I finished the hem with a simple zigzag stitch.  And Ta Dah!  I have a brand new fun and flowy dress!  Because I used powernet in the bodice, waistband, and straps, and elastic under the bust, I didn’t need to add swim cups or wear a bra with this dress.  And I’ve already had two random strangers ask me where I found such a cute dress.

 


WFY side

See how the seam where the skirt is attached runs perfectly parallel across the back?

WFY back

Laughing while modelling your makes is half the fun!

WFY hair

And of course I had to twirl!  Whenever you make a twirly skirt, you can’t help but twirl!

WFY wind

This pattern mash was a complete success, and something I’m bound to make again.  After sewing it, I realize it’s probably pretty close to the Water Faery Retro One Piece dress option, and that’s ok, because it looks like a great pattern.  Since I already own the Twist & Swim Top, and would never wear a one piece, I don’t feel like I have to buy the pattern just for the dress option.  (Although if you’re not yet comfortable with pattern mashing or hacking, it is a great option).

One of the best things about sewing is being able to personalize patterns, mixing and mashing, and hacking them to suit your body, and your style.  Are you ready to try a pattern mash?

 

This post may contain affiliate links.  This means that at no extra cost to you, I may receive a small commission if you purchase through my links.  As always, I only give my honest opinion.  After all, it is my blog, which represents me! 😉  Thank you for reading and sharing my love of sewing, patterns, fabric, and pattern mashing and hacking. ❤ 

 

Titania Tunic Workout Top Hack

From Dressy Tunic To Workout Ready

Whenever I make a cute top, I can’t help but think about how I could make it into a cute workout top!  The Stitch Upon A Time Titania Top & Tunic was the perfect base for a workout top hack.  Since dresses are a year round staple for me, it’s also going to end up as a dress once I add 8 or 9 inches to the tunic length.  The tunic itself turned out quite cute.  I like the flowy body, especially in this silky soft circular knit.  It has the perfect drape for this pattern.  Can you imagine the twirl in a dress length?

Titania frontTitania side.jpg

Can you see my elastic error in these photos?  Instead of following the elastic length cut chart for the armscye, I thought the elastic should be more taught.  Making it 2 inches shorter than recommended gave me puckering and a bit of rolling at the armpits.  I should know by now to trust Jennifer of Stitch Upon A Time’s design and testing and use the recommended length!  The neckband was easy to sew, and despite being a higher neckline than I normally wear, the rounded shape doesn’t cut into my neck or shoulders.  Using the built in shelf bra means not having to worry about wearing a strapless bra, or trying to find a bra with straps that don’t show.  The stylish tunic would look great with skinny jeans or fitted pants like the Goldilegs Jeans, and of course with a slim skirt or shorts.

Hacking the shelf bra pieces into a workout top is easier than you think.  Cut two bra fronts out of Supplex.  Rather than cutting the back out on the fold of the fabric, I folded my pattern piece under 5/8″ from the center back, and cut out two left back and two right back pieces.  You’ll also cut a bra front and a right and left back out of powernet or techsheen for support.  For design purposes, I wanted the bra back to have a 2″ strip of powernet down the center, with a little opening between the bra top and the tank body.  I used my favorite tank pattern to make the bodice.  If you don’t have a tank pattern, trace any well fitting tank in your closet.  Don’t forget to add seam allowances!

The trickiest part of this workout top is the V-cutout on the center front.  Lay your clear ruler on an angle, starting 1″ from center front at the top, and down 5-1/2″.  Do the same thing to the second bra front piece, then trim the 3/8″ seam allowance off the second triangle cutout opening.  The trimmed version will become your front lining piece.

Titania cut triTitania triangle cutout

Lay the triangle you cut out of the bra front on your powernet.  Add 3/4″ width to each of the long sides of the triangle as seam allowances.  This gives you the front triangle insert.  Cut a rectangular piece of powernet 2-3/4″ wide, by 2″ shorter than the length of your bra back at center back.  This gives you the back insert.

Baste your powernet/techsheen bra front and backs to the wrong side of your bra lining front and back pieces.  You will treat them as one layer from this point on.  Right sides facing, sew one long side of your triangle insert to the cutout section of your bra front, using a 3/8″ seam allowance.  Snip the center front of the bra down to, but not through the stitching line.  And here’s where I’m going to make it easy to get a perfect V.  With your bra top right side up on a flat surface, fold the seam allowance of the unstitched side of the opening under 3/8″.  Apply Washaway Wonder Tape to the seam allowance.  Making sure that your powernet insert triangle is laying smooth and flat, peel off the backing paper and press the folded under edge of your opening onto the powernet.  You can baste that side into place, or just trust the Wonder Tape to do it’s job.  (Although I am a big believer in basting, I trusted the Wonder Tape and it held fine until I was ready to topstitch all my layers.)

Right sides together, and lined up at the top edge, sew the rectangular powernet insert to one side of the bra back.  Line the insert up with the top of other side of the bra back and stitch, using 3/8″ seam allowances.

Titania back net

Sew the front and back bra pieces together at the side seams.  Sew the lining front and back bra pieces together at the side seams.  Note: the pattern calls for 1/2″ seam allowances, so be sure to use this seam allowance on the side seams, even though I use 3/8″ seam allowances on the rest of this hack.  Fold the center back edges of the bra lining under 3/8″ and baste.

Titania wrap back

With the bra right side out, and the lining wrong side out, place the bra lining over the bra.  Line up the neck and arm openings, and pin in place.  With right sides together,  stitch along the armscyes and add the elastic in the seam allowances as per the pattern tutorial.  Stitch the front and back necklines leaving openings at the shoulders to add straps.  Cut two pieces of bra strapping 6″ long.  Slide a strap down inside each shoulder opening at the back, and with the end of the strap flush with the opening, stitch the straps in place.  You may want to go over the stitch line twice to ensure that the straps are secure.  Turn the bra right side out.  Ensuring that the triangle insert and cutout opening are properly aligned, top stitch around the triangle.

Titania tri topstitch

Lining up the edges of the back and back lining so that they are even with the rectangle insert, top stitch along the edges.

Titania rect top

Now you can try on the bra, and adjust the length of the straps to fit.  You may end up cutting a couple of inches off, but you need long enough peices to work with!  Slide the ends of the straps down into the openings at the front shoulders, turn the top wrong sides out, and stitch the straps in place at the front shoulders.

Sew your tank front and back bodice pieces together.  Then slide the bra down inside the tank with right sides together, and matching center points on the front and back, stitch.  Using the measurement in the cut chart, wrap a piece of elastic around your underbust to check for fit.  I used 1-1/4″ wide sport elastic, rather than the recommended width.  Use whatever width of elastic that works for you, or that you happen to have on hand.  The elastic should fit snugly, but not uncomfortably.  Overlap the ends and stitch together.  Mark quarter points on your elastic, and at the seam allowance, and pin together at those 4 points.  Stretching the elastic to fit, zig zag it in place.  Turn the hem of your workout top under 3/4″ and use a zig zag, twin needle or coverstitch machine to finish.

Smile, and go for a walk or run, or hit the gym or yoga studio in your fun new workout top!

Titania workout back

I bought all of my fabric, the Circular Knit, Supplex, Powernet, and Techsheen from Phee Fabrics, along with the clear elastic and bra strapping.  The consistently high quality makes and keeps me a repeat shopper!

 

*This post may contain affiliate links.  This means that at no extra cost to you, I may receive a small commission if you purchase through my links.  As always, I only give my honest opinion.  After all, it is my blog, which represents me!  Thank you for reading and sharing my love of sewing, patterns, fabric, and pattern hacking. 😉

 

 

The Aushui Tank Transformation

Transforming The Stitch Upon A Time Aushui Tank Into A Dress

I bought the Stitch Upon A Time Aushui Tank pattern because who doesn’t need a unique tank top in their lives?  The square cut neckline was a new look for me, and I love tanks with straps that completely cover your bra.  The pattern is a pretty quick sew, and the facings really help the tank keep it’s unique shape.  It also has options for a button placket and a tie front, which will totally change the look!

Rayon spandex from Phee Fabrics made for a soft, comfortable tank, with excellent drape.  I added two inches to the length because I am tall and like longer tanks.  But I certainly could have stuck to the pattern length and been just fine.

Aushui tankAushui back

Once I made the tank I started thinking that it would be fun to make the Aushui into a dress.  Not only are dresses a summer time staple, they also make it easy to get ready in the morning.  Wanting to keep the lines of the dress clean, a gathered seam at the waistline was out.  A simple fit and flare design fit the bill, so I pulled out the Stitch Upon A Time Calista pattern.  The skirt portion of the Calista flares out nicely, without being too full.

The hardest part of this pattern mash was determining where the skirt should start!  Fit and flare dresses look best when they are fitted through the bust area and flare out at or just above the natural waist.  A novice sewist may be surprised to learn that your natural waist isn’t necessarily at your belly button.  Tie a string, strip of fabric, or piece of elastic around your waist, and bend side to side several times.  The elastic will settle at your natural waist which may be above your belly button.

Lay the Calista skirt pattern on top of the Aushui Tank front, with the center folds aligned.   Slide the top of the skirt up to the bustline marking.  With the patterns taped together, cut out the front of your dress.  Align the Calista skirt the same way on the tank back, and cut out the dress back.  There will be a little area where the tank and skirt pieces intersect at a sharp angle.  Gently curve this area (where the purple arrow is pointing in the second photo) when you cut out your dress.

Aushui Cal tapeAushui Cal cut

Then follow the pattern tutorial for construction of view A.  The only difference will be the length of your side seams.  Take your time and use plenty of pins when folding up the hem.  That way you’ll get a nice even hem when you finish your dress.  Pro tip: sewing a line of stitches down the center of the back facing before construction will make it easy to tell the front from the back when you’re hanging up laundry or getting dressed.   If you have a vinyl cutting machine, a cute little HTV design would make a good “tag”

I used Phee Fabrics Tricot for my dress and absolutely love the drape and swing of my Aushui Calista pattern mash!  It’s a fun, flirty length, without being too short.  It only took two yards of fabric, and I have large enough scraps that I can probably make another swimsuit. 😉  You can read about my Water Faery and Scrundlewear bikini here.

Aushui CalistaAushui Cal full

I need more of these dresses in my life!  I’m so glad I played around with the patterns, and that my dress turned out even cuter than I imagined!  There’s no reason to be afraid of trying something new, and hacking and mashing your patterns.  You might just end up with a new favorite dress, or other cute clothing in your wardrobe!

 

*This post may contain affiliate links.  This means that at no extra cost to you, I may receive a small commission if you purchase through my links.  As always, I only give my honest opinion.  After all, it is my blog, which represents me!  Thank you for reading and sharing my love of sewing, patterns, fabric, and pattern hacking. 😉

 

S.U.A.T. Brazi/Calista Mash-Up

Mash it, and hack it, and make that dress your own!

I love the Stitch Upon A Time Brazi pattern.  I was so intimidated to try making my own bra that I eyed it for a month before I finally bought the pattern!  Since then I’ve made several workout bras for myself, a nursing bra for my daughter and a Brazi dress that I wear all the time.  I’ve hacked it for straight straps and removable bra cups and decided, why not mash it with the S.U.A.T. Calista?  Once you feel comfortable with a pattern and know the best fabrics to make it with, it is easy to branch out and try something new with it.

Brazi patternPlease note that out of respect for the designers, and protection of their intellectual property, I will not show full pattern pieces.  I bought the cross-front add-on when I bought the Brazi pattern because I love the look and knew that it would be the most flattering for my body type.  But you can do the straight strap hack on the original pattern.  I simply marked my pattern where it curves from cup to strap, and folded it under 1/2″ above that.  I folded the back straps under and cut out my modified pattern pieces.  I cut four 2″x13″ rectangles out of my fabric as my strap and strap lining pieces.
Choosing the perfect fabric is always the fun part of sewing.  And using high quality fabric is key when making a supportive and functional bra.  I love using Phee Fabrics circular knit, nylon/spandex, and rayon/spandex for my Brazi’s.  But the not-so-secret part to trim powernetbeing successful at supporting “the girls” is powernet.  And I’m not talking the decorative looking mesh stuff I’ve seen at a national fabric and crafts store.  Phee Fabrics powernet is legit!  It holds everything where it belongs.

I cut out my pattern pieces using the same fabric for the main and lining pieces and also cut all my pieces out of powernet. I trim the powernet 1/8″ to 1/4″ smaller on all sides except the side seams.  

pin powernetpowernet bastedPin the trimmed powernet pieces to your lining pieces and baste in place.  Do not baste along the side seams!  To make the pocket for your bra cups, lay your cups on top of the bra front and mark the height.  Sewing a horizontal line across the height mark will keep your cups from shifting out of place.

cross-frontSew your main and lining front pieces right side together.  The pattern tutorial recommends using elastic along the front edge of the cups.  Using the elastic adds another layer of security if you are concerned about anything showing when you lean forward.

back opening

I marked and pinned my back pieces together and left the center 4″ open when I sewed the top seam so that I would have room to insert the straps later.

 

 

sewing sideseamside seam sewn pinned

Open up your front main and lining piece and match it up with your back main and lining.  Here’s the tricky part: sew the outer main fabric together, sewing down about an inch into the lining and then sew the bottom inch together.  Pull the lining fabric of the bra front out of the seam line and tuck it out of the way as you pin the powernet and back lining pieces together.  You may need to use your finger to hold the fabric out of the way as you sew the other 3 layers together.  This will give you the opening on the inside of the side seam for you to insert and remove a bra cup.

bra cup accessRepeat the process with the other side seam.  At this point you can follow the pattern directions about matching your center front notches, adjusting strap length, sewing on your bra band or skirt and adding the elastic.

hem dipSince I was adding the Calista skirt to the Brazi top, and the bottom of the two bras are different shapes, I knew that I might need to make some adjustments.  You might like the look of the dipped hem my mash produced, but I am kind of old school, and like my hems to be level with the floor.  I had an easy fix for my problem.

alter hemtrimmed hem

I laid the skirt pattern on the skirt, pivoted it up from the center front fold to 2″ above the side seams. I flipped the pattern over and repeated the process on the skirt back.  I hemmed the skirt and my Brazi/Calista mash-up was complete!

In hindsight, I should have just traced the top curve of the Brazi skirt instead of following the straight edge of the Calista skirt.  But since the skirt was already sewn on, and I didn’t feel like seam ripping, cutting the bottom worked.  I’ll definitely use the Brazi skirt curve in my future makes!

Although I can add bra cups if I want, I wore my new dress all day and took these photos without using any cups.  THAT is how well quality powernet works!  So hack and mash and sew away!  And enjoy wearing your comfortable, personalized creation.

Brazi Calista backBrazi Calista1

 

*This post may contain affiliate links.  This means that at no extra cost to you, I may receive a small commission if you purchase through my links.  As always, I only give my honest opinion.  After all, it is my blog, which represents me!  Thank you for reading and supporting my love of sewing!