Water Faery Workout Top Version 2

Because One Hack Is Never Enough!

Don’t you love it when you feel like you really got your money’s worth out of a pattern?  Fortunately there are quite a few patterns that have enough options, that fit so well, and are a great basis for a pattern hack or mash, and the Stitch Upon A Time Water Faery is one of them.  I’ve used the Water Faery Twist & Swim Top pattern to make swim tops and hacked it into a workout top, blogged here.  I’ve also made it into a dress, linked here.

As my first workout top used the twist front bodice, I decided to keep this top simple with the plain front.  Since the Water Faery is designed as swimwear, the body is quite fitted.  So you’ll want to use a well fitting tank pattern (like the Versa Cami) for the body of your workout top.  To add a little pizazz (and because my charcoal Supplex scraps weren’t big enough to make a solid back body!) 😉 I added a triangular wedge at center back.  I simply folded the back at an angle at the center back fold line from 1″ wide at the bottom, tapering up to nothing at the top.

WF triangle

Using a folded piece of white paper, I traced the line of the angle that was folded away while cutting the two back halves.  The fold line is the center back, the pencil line is the “folded away” section, and then I drew a line 3/4″ further out to account for the 3/8″ seam allowances I used when sewing the purple triangular strip in between the two back body halves.

WF back angle

Other than narrowing the straps to end up 1-1/8″ wide, the bodice is sewn as per the pattern tutorial.  Keep in mind that it is important to use a layer of high quality powernet in the bodice front and back, along with the suggested elastic, to provide support.

Once the bodice and tank body are constructed, slide the bodice inside the body, matching up the center front, back, and quarter points, and stitch with right sides together.  While the body is still folded on top of the bodice, use a zigzag stitch to sew the recommended length of 1-1/4″ wide sport elastic onto the seam allowance.  When your top is inside out, it will look like the photo below, with the elastic hanging down below the underbust seam.

WF elastic

All you’ve got left to do now is to hem the bottom, and you can wear your new workout top to yoga class, or for whatever your favorite exercise routine is!

WF hips close

WF back

Taking the time to press your seams as you sew, and changing your thread color to match the triangular insert when hemming that section really helps to give your garment a professional finish.  I love that a few simple changes, and a little bit of extra time can turn some not-quite-big-enough scraps into a fun addition to your workout wardrobe!

I purchased all my fabric, the grape and charcoal Supplex, and the powernet from Phee Fabrics.

 

This post may contain affiliate links.  This means that at no extra cost to you, I may receive a small commission/credit if you purchase through my links.  As always, I only give my honest opinion.  After all, it is my blog, which represents me! 🙂  Thank you for reading and sharing my love of sewing, patterns, fabric, and pattern hacking. ❤

Super Fun Super G’s

And A Simple Pocket Hack

GreenStyle Super G Tights are my “go-to” workout pants pattern.  I’ve sewn more than a half dozen pairs for myself and a pair for my daughter.  I’ve perfected the pattern to suit me, and decided to really have fun with this pair.  Since it’s hot year round in Florida, I prefer capri length (or an inch or two shorter).  It’s easy to fit capri length on one yard of fabric, with enough left over to make a workout top.  The G in Super G stands for the gusset.  It’s one long piece that stretches from calf to calf, and gives your workout tights lots of stretch and movement.

Since the gusset pattern piece is longer than 36″, simply fold up the ends on the gusset pattern, and cut the ends (adding in seam allowances) out of the same or an accent fabric.  It’s a fun way to add another little bit of accent to the inside of your leg.

Supplex is literally the best fabric for workout tights.  I’ve used Tricot as the accent fabric on the side pocket panels of my Super G’s, but my favorite accent fabric is Powernet.  It gives a little more ventilation, and adds a little bit of sexy sheerness. SG flat

On the teal and navy pairs in the photo above, I used Powernet for the upper and lower pocket pieces.  That makes the panels sheer all the way to the waistband.  This doesn’t bother me, but if you’re looking for more coverage, use Supplex or Tricot for your upper pocket piece.

Normally, the lower pocket panel of the Super G’s gets stitched to the upper pocket, and the lower panel fabric gets folded under to form a pocket, effectively hiding the seam.  Since I’ve made so many pairs of Super G’s, I thought it would be fun to give the pocket on this pair a different look.  (It also means that you can use shorter pieces of powernet, 😉  in case you only bought a half yard.)  The pocket can be moved down about an inch or so, and still be wide enough to hold a large iPhone.  You may have noticed this hack on my Super G’s in this post, where the pocket is Supplex and the upper and lower panels are powernet.

 

SG panels adj

The fold in the lower pocket panel piece on the left shows where the pocket seam will be.  I cut 3/8″ above that (where I am pointing) to give a seam allowance.  I added an inch to the bottom of the upper pocket panel piece, (on the right in the photo above.)  Now I just need a pocket piece which was made by tracing the folded over pocket section (the top portion of that left pattern piece.)  And then the real fun began!

SG panels white

I placed several long strips of plastic wrap on my glass dining table to protect it, and laid  the powernet pattern pieces I had cut out on it.  The little bit showing at the top left corner was used for a workout top.  The small triangular pieces are the gusset end pieces.  The pockets are on the lower left, and the lower pocket side panels are on the right.  (I used Supplex for the upper pocket panels.)

Art is often an experiment, no matter what media you choose.  It is a wonderful way to play and express yourself.  And you get to play with color, yay!  Since the grape Supplex I was using for my Super G’s was such a fun color, I knew I wanted to do something fun on the side panels.  Michaels Arts & Crafts stores often have 50% off coupons in their weekly email ads.  Which I greatly appreciate, since the Marvy Uchida Fabri-Ink kit I wanted to try was $25.

Fabri-Ink

I chose the fluorescent set since the purple, turquoise, and green fit solidly in my little wedge of the color wheel.  The set includes refillable brushes, but that didn’t sound as fun as randomly dropping splotches of diluted fabric ink with an eye dropper!  The darker splotches were diluted 50/50 with water, and the lighter ones are about 25% ink and 75% water.

SG panels dyed

Things to keep in mind: I always pre-wash my fabric before it gets folded and put in my stash for use.  Never, ever, ever skip this step.  This removes any dust, dirt, or chemicals that may have gotten on your fabric from the manufacturing process or during freight.  You do not want that on your skin, cutting mat, or machine.  It also gets any possible shrinkage out of the way.  Ink is permanent, so protect your work surface, hands, and clothes.  I let the ink dry overnight (although it dries in a matter of minutes) then pressed it with an iron to heat set it.

Mark the back edge of each side pocket panel pattern piece with a clip to avoid confusion later.  To assemble the panels, fold the top edge of the pocket under 1″, press, and topstitch with a decorative stitch.  Lay the pockets on the upper pocket panels, right sides up, aligning the bottom edges, and baste along the sides.  Then lay the lower panel on top of the pockets, right sides together, and stitch.  Press the seam up (so it won’t be visible through the lower panel), and topstitch with a decorative stitch.

sew SG panels

With the side pocket panels done, you can simply follow the pattern tutorial to finish up your super fun Super G’s.

SG pocket foilageSG Jillian back

I’ll tell you a funny story about taking these photos.  This pretty foliage is along a rather busy road.  It can be kind of awkward posing for photos with cars driving by.  While posing so my husband could take a photo of the back of my Super G’s, I asked him if my booty looked good.  Right then a truck drove by and the young man in the passenger seat leaned out the window and whistled at me.  Straight-faced, my husband answered, “I think you have your answer!” 🙂 Hahahahahahaha!

Super G pocketSG side

I love these early morning photos because the colorful sky is a pretty backdrop for my super fun and colorful Super G’s.  And who doesn’t love the sound of the ocean as background music?

Sewing is an art, so don’t be afraid to experiment with it, and with other forms of art to make your own fun projects.

All fabric was purchased from Phee Fabrics.  The white Supplex workout top is the GreenStyle Jillian I hacked to have powernet inserts and a pocket, blogged here.  The teal and grape Supplex workout top is another fun hack I’ll be posting soon.

 

This post may contain affiliate links.  This means that at no extra cost to you, I may receive a small commission/credit if you purchase through my links.  As always, I only give my honest opinion.  After all, it is my blog, which represents me! 🙂  Thank you for reading and sharing my love of sewing, patterns, fabric, art, and pattern hacking. ❤

 

Titania Tunic Workout Top Hack

From Dressy Tunic To Workout Ready

Whenever I make a cute top, I can’t help but think about how I could make it into a cute workout top!  The Stitch Upon A Time Titania Top & Tunic was the perfect base for a workout top hack.  Since dresses are a year round staple for me, it’s also going to end up as a dress once I add 8 or 9 inches to the tunic length.  The tunic itself turned out quite cute.  I like the flowy body, especially in this silky soft circular knit.  It has the perfect drape for this pattern.  Can you imagine the twirl in a dress length?

Titania frontTitania side.jpg

Can you see my elastic error in these photos?  Instead of following the elastic length cut chart for the armscye, I thought the elastic should be more taught.  Making it 2 inches shorter than recommended gave me puckering and a bit of rolling at the armpits.  I should know by now to trust Jennifer of Stitch Upon A Time’s design and testing and use the recommended length!  The neckband was easy to sew, and despite being a higher neckline than I normally wear, the rounded shape doesn’t cut into my neck or shoulders.  Using the built in shelf bra means not having to worry about wearing a strapless bra, or trying to find a bra with straps that don’t show.  The stylish tunic would look great with skinny jeans or fitted pants like the Goldilegs Jeans, and of course with a slim skirt or shorts.

Hacking the shelf bra pieces into a workout top is easier than you think.  Cut two bra fronts out of Supplex.  Rather than cutting the back out on the fold of the fabric, I folded my pattern piece under 5/8″ from the center back, and cut out two left back and two right back pieces.  You’ll also cut a bra front and a right and left back out of powernet or techsheen for support.  For design purposes, I wanted the bra back to have a 2″ strip of powernet down the center, with a little opening between the bra top and the tank body.  I used my favorite tank pattern to make the bodice.  If you don’t have a tank pattern, trace any well fitting tank in your closet.  Don’t forget to add seam allowances!

The trickiest part of this workout top is the V-cutout on the center front.  Lay your clear ruler on an angle, starting 1″ from center front at the top, and down 5-1/2″.  Do the same thing to the second bra front piece, then trim the 3/8″ seam allowance off the second triangle cutout opening.  The trimmed version will become your front lining piece.

Titania cut triTitania triangle cutout

Lay the triangle you cut out of the bra front on your powernet.  Add 3/4″ width to each of the long sides of the triangle as seam allowances.  This gives you the front triangle insert.  Cut a rectangular piece of powernet 2-3/4″ wide, by 2″ shorter than the length of your bra back at center back.  This gives you the back insert.

Baste your powernet/techsheen bra front and backs to the wrong side of your bra lining front and back pieces.  You will treat them as one layer from this point on.  Right sides facing, sew one long side of your triangle insert to the cutout section of your bra front, using a 3/8″ seam allowance.  Snip the center front of the bra down to, but not through the stitching line.  And here’s where I’m going to make it easy to get a perfect V.  With your bra top right side up on a flat surface, fold the seam allowance of the unstitched side of the opening under 3/8″.  Apply Washaway Wonder Tape to the seam allowance.  Making sure that your powernet insert triangle is laying smooth and flat, peel off the backing paper and press the folded under edge of your opening onto the powernet.  You can baste that side into place, or just trust the Wonder Tape to do it’s job.  (Although I am a big believer in basting, I trusted the Wonder Tape and it held fine until I was ready to topstitch all my layers.)

Right sides together, and lined up at the top edge, sew the rectangular powernet insert to one side of the bra back.  Line the insert up with the top of other side of the bra back and stitch, using 3/8″ seam allowances.

Titania back net

Sew the front and back bra pieces together at the side seams.  Sew the lining front and back bra pieces together at the side seams.  Note: the pattern calls for 1/2″ seam allowances, so be sure to use this seam allowance on the side seams, even though I use 3/8″ seam allowances on the rest of this hack.  Fold the center back edges of the bra lining under 3/8″ and baste.

Titania wrap back

With the bra right side out, and the lining wrong side out, place the bra lining over the bra.  Line up the neck and arm openings, and pin in place.  With right sides together,  stitch along the armscyes and add the elastic in the seam allowances as per the pattern tutorial.  Stitch the front and back necklines leaving openings at the shoulders to add straps.  Cut two pieces of bra strapping 6″ long.  Slide a strap down inside each shoulder opening at the back, and with the end of the strap flush with the opening, stitch the straps in place.  You may want to go over the stitch line twice to ensure that the straps are secure.  Turn the bra right side out.  Ensuring that the triangle insert and cutout opening are properly aligned, top stitch around the triangle.

Titania tri topstitch

Lining up the edges of the back and back lining so that they are even with the rectangle insert, top stitch along the edges.

Titania rect top

Now you can try on the bra, and adjust the length of the straps to fit.  You may end up cutting a couple of inches off, but you need long enough peices to work with!  Slide the ends of the straps down into the openings at the front shoulders, turn the top wrong sides out, and stitch the straps in place at the front shoulders.

Sew your tank front and back bodice pieces together.  Then slide the bra down inside the tank with right sides together, and matching center points on the front and back, stitch.  Using the measurement in the cut chart, wrap a piece of elastic around your underbust to check for fit.  I used 1-1/4″ wide sport elastic, rather than the recommended width.  Use whatever width of elastic that works for you, or that you happen to have on hand.  The elastic should fit snugly, but not uncomfortably.  Overlap the ends and stitch together.  Mark quarter points on your elastic, and at the seam allowance, and pin together at those 4 points.  Stretching the elastic to fit, zig zag it in place.  Turn the hem of your workout top under 3/4″ and use a zig zag, twin needle or coverstitch machine to finish.

Smile, and go for a walk or run, or hit the gym or yoga studio in your fun new workout top!

Titania workout back

I bought all of my fabric, the Circular Knit, Supplex, Powernet, and Techsheen from Phee Fabrics, along with the clear elastic and bra strapping.  The consistently high quality makes and keeps me a repeat shopper!

 

*This post may contain affiliate links.  This means that at no extra cost to you, I may receive a small commission if you purchase through my links.  As always, I only give my honest opinion.  After all, it is my blog, which represents me!  Thank you for reading and sharing my love of sewing, patterns, fabric, and pattern hacking. 😉

 

 

GreenStyle Jillian Tank

Powernet “Colorblocking” And A Hidden Seam Pocket

I love sewing workout wear for several reasons.  First of all, I need something to wear to yoga class.  Secondly, I am far too frugal to spend $50 or more on a cute workout top.  And last but not least, I can customize my makes to suit my style and color preferences.

I have had the vision of a white workout top with powernet inserts floating around in my head for a while.  I just hadn’t gotten around to sewing one up.  Enter the GreenStyle Jillian Tank (on sale for 15% off as a May 2019 “Pattern of the Month”). 🙂   The pattern is loaded with options: a bandeau top; an inner tank, with or without a built in sports bra; and an outer tank that can be made with knit or woven fabric.  I chose to make the inner tank with a built in sports bra.

I used white Supplex and white Powernet from Phee Fabrics to make my Jillian Tank.  I like the simple design of the Jillian inner tank, because it gives the powernet inserts the opportunity to stand out.  Adding inserts is really easy, it’s basically a simple color blocking technique.  I cut two right angle triangles out of my powernet, being sure to cut them straight on the grain, with the greatest stretch going side to side.  The sides of the L part of the triangles were 7″ long.  I laid the triangles on the bottom corner of the tank front, and trimmed off the excess powernet to match the shape of the corners.

Jillian triangle

I marked the tank front 6.25″ up and 6.25″ over from the bottom corner and using my quilting ruler and rotary cutter, cut off the (smaller sized) triangles from the bottom corners of my tank front.  Then I laid the powernet triangles on the tank front right sides together and stitched them together.  I pressed the seam allowances toward the Supplex and top-stitched them in place so that you wouldn’t see them through the powernet.

Jillian power

I like to walk the beach whenever I get the chance.  Since I don’t want to have to carry my phone and keys, I need pockets.  I put pockets in all my workout tights and shorts, but occasionally, I’ll find myself wearing something without pockets.  So why not start adding pockets to my workout tops?  A hidden seam pocket gives cleaner lines than a patch pocket, not to mention how much easier it is to keep straight while sewing!

I cut a 4.5″ wide by 8″ tall rectangle out of powernet.  I made it that large to ensure that my phone would stay snugly in place, yet still be able to reach in and grab a key or lip balm from the bottom of the pocket.  I folded the top of the pocket down and stitched it in place.  Then I laid the pocket right sides together 3.75″ from the right edge of the tank back at the bottom corner.  I stitched along the right hand side of the pocket.

Jillian pock 1

Then I flipped the pocket over and basted it along the side seam, and zig-zagged it in place along the bottom of the pocket.  (Had I cut the pocket a bit longer, I would have lined it up with the bottom of the tank and just basted it in place.)  When the tank is hemmed, the bottom of the pocket is securely sewn in place.

Jillian pock 2

After these simple modifications, I just followed the pattern tutorial to complete my tank.  I made another small adjustment to the pattern out of necessity.  The pattern calls for double straps threaded through the top of the front shoulder strap.   Rather than cutting and sewing the straps, I used plush bra strap elastic to speed up my sewing time. Since my strapping was wider than the sewn straps would have been, I went with a single strap.

Jillian back

I love having a solid white workout top to mix and match with my Super G‘s.  The powernet inserts and pocket give the simple lines a little extra pizazz.

Jillian G frontJillian G side

I can style it with a skirt or shorts for a completely different look.

Jillian hand

I could see myself using this simple color-blocking technique to add in coordinating fabrics if I were trying to match workout tights with color-blocked side panels.  The hidden seam pocket can be customized to fit whatever you want to carry.  It’s so much more useful than the tiny little key pockets you find on ready to wear!

Go ahead and sew all the workout wear!  After all, it is #memademay.

 

*This post may contain affiliate links.  This means that at no extra cost to you, I may receive a small commission if you purchase through my links.  As always, I only give my honest opinion.  After all, it is my blog, which represents me!  Thank you for reading and sharing my love of sewing and pattern hacking. 😉

5oo4 Escapade Experiment

From Ties To A Strap, And A Little Ventilation

I literally cannot seem to stop myself when it comes to hacking patterns.  I’ll buy a pattern because it’s a cute design, or has lots of options, and I may or may not make it as written.  Then I’ll start thinking, “Maybe it would be fun to add…” or, “What if I changed that into…”  There are some really talented .pdf pattern designers out there, and I am so impressed by them, because I don’t have the talent to design a pattern.  They’ve done the hard work of figuring out fit and design.  And I get to do the fun part of personalizing patterns to suit me, or fill a need in my wardrobe.

I bought the 5 Out Of 4 Patterns Escapade Top and Dress pattern months ago, and hadn’t gotten around to making it yet.  I love all the options: bikini top; tankini style top, and dress.  When I first bought the pattern, I think I planned to make the dress first.  I love dresses.  And since the Escapade has a built in bra, it’s an easy way to get dressed in the morning!  But I usually go to yoga class 4 days a week, so a workout top was a bigger need than a dress.  Which is what led to my experiment.

The Escapade is designed to have a drawstring style strap that can be tied halter style (handy if you are nursing or want to easily adjust the strap length), or tacked in place as straight or criss-crossed straps.  Since I enjoy Ashtanga and Power Flow yoga classes, there is a lot of movement involved, and I do NOT want any movement or shifting of my straps!  There is also a center front tie that gives separation, shaping, and lift to the bra front, but I didn’t want to feel the tie when we do upward bow or other floor work.  So that’s what led me to my hacks.

I made my Escapade using Supplex and Powernet from Phee Fabrics.  Supplex is hands down my favorite fabric for workout wear.  It’s moisture wicking and antimicrobial, so you don’t feel all sweaty or get stinky clothes from your workout.  High quality powernet is essential for good support when you’re making bras, so I always use it in the front and back of my workout bras.

I cut out all my pattern pieces except for the drawstring strap, since I made that by cutting two 1.5″ x 30″ strips of Supplex and one strip out of powernet.  I sewed them with the Supplex right sides together and the powernet on top along the two long sides.  I used a safety pin to turn the strap right side out, then pressed it flat.

Esc turn strap

I basted the powernet to the wrong side of the bra front and back lining pieces, then sewed the lining together at the side seams.  I also sewed the bra front and back together at the side seams.  I turned the bra right sides out, and slid the bra lining over it, right sides together.  I pinned them together along the top edge, then sewed along the top edge leaving an inch in the center back, and an inch at the bra front top points open.

Esc pinnedI used a strip of powernet 1.5″ x 4″ to make my center back strap loop.  I folded it in half lengthwise, and sewed it with a 3/8″ seam allowance.  I turned it right side out, made a loop, slid it inside the center back opening I had left in the bra, and stitched it in place.  Then I sewed 1/4″ clear elastic in the seam allowance along the top of the bra using a zig zag stitch.  I stretched it slightly from the side seam up to the bra front points.  I also stretched it slightly along the center front from point to point.

Esc elasticStitch one end of your strap in place at one of the bra front points, turn the bra right sides out, string the strap through the loop and try it on.  Adjust the strap length to fit you comfortably, while still feeling supportive.  Then turn it inside out again to stitch the strap at the appropriate length, and trim off the excess.  I think I ended up cutting a couple of inches off of mine.

Esc strapsBecause I didn’t want the center front tie, I just made a gathering stitch down the center front of the bra top, and stitched my gathers in place with a zig zag, followed by a stretch stitch to ensure that my gathers stayed in place even with the frequent wearing and washing my workout tops get.

To add interest and a little ventilation to the back of my top,  I marked a spot 5.25″ down from the top of the center back bodice, and 2.5″ from the center back fold and cut this triangle off with my rotary cutter.

Esc cut triThen I cut a 6″ triangle out of my powernet.  You can use the triangle you cut out of the bodice, (adding 3/4″ on the two sides to give yourself a seam allowance) as a pattern.

Esc triangles

Stitch the powernet insert in place on the center back, taking your time when you get to the point, lifting your presser foot, and swiveling to continue the seam up the other side of the triangle.  I’m not going to lie, my triangle shifted a bit while sewing, and I seam ripped and resewed the point more than once.  Oh, the joys of perfectionism while sewing!  Use lots of pins to hold things in place, take your time, and hopefully you won’t have to seam rip and resew like me.  Press the seam allowance toward the Supplex so that it won’t show through the powernet, and topstitch in place.

You can follow the pattern tutorial at this point to finish up your top.  I wore my top to Ashtanga yoga class yesterday, and appreciated the ventilated triangle in the middle of my back.  It was a great, rather sweaty workout and I felt cute and comfortable.

I paired the top with my GreenStyle Super G’s, which have powernet side pocket panels, so my new Escapade top gave me a cute matching workout outfit.

Esc frontEsc back full

Don’t be afraid to try a hack to make a great pattern suit your needs.  I will definitely use this pattern again.  I think I will try the dress version next.  Maybe in circular knit, or tricot… Which do you think?

 

*This post may contain affiliate links.  This means that at no extra cost to you, I may receive a small commission if you purchase through my links.  As always, I only give my honest opinion.  After all, it is my blog, which represents me!  Thank you for reading and sharing my love of sewing and pattern hacking. 😉

 

5oo4 Zen Pants Made As Shorts

And An Internal Patch Pocket Hack

Summer time means shorts, and nothing screams summer like bright, white shorts.  They look great with any color tank or tee, or thrown on over a swimsuit.  In my quest to use every pattern in my collection I decided to try the 5 Out Of 4 Patterns Zen Pants, using the shorts cut line.  The Zen Pants are a slim fit with optional front and back patch pockets and a side cargo pocket.  There is also an optional faux fly, and drawstring waistband.

I like my shorts to be a smooth line under my tanks and wanted a dressy casual look, so I wanted to streamline as much as possible.  Pockets are an absolute necessity, so I decided to turn the large patch pockets into smaller internal patch pockets, and to forego any other ornamentation.  It’s fun to customize patterns to suit my needs, and I’m never afraid to try a simple hack.  As I have noted before, I don’t show full pattern pieces to protect designers intellectual property.

The first step of altering the pocket was to decide how wide I wanted it.  I laid my phone on the pattern pocket piece and knew that I could slim it down to the width of the X-small pocket.  I laid my traced out pants front piece onto the master pattern pocket and used a pencil to draw lines from the hip up and from the top out to the outer top corner.  I also curved the pocket side to follow the curve of the hip on the pants front.  I am pointing to this area in the photo below.  (The dashed line is the original pattern shape of the outer top corner of the pocket.)

Z pocket alter

Laying the pants front on the master pattern pocket piece allowed me to trace the curve to make the pocket opening on the pants front.  That small piece in the upper corner of the photo below is the piece I cut off and discarded.  I also hacked the pocket facing, (which is used to reinforce the pocket opening.)  I like my pocket facings to be about an inch wide, so I traced the top curve of the pocket facing piece and just made it an inch wide.

Z pocket fac

Next I laid out all my pattern pieces and cut them out my fabric.  You could use a ponte or one of the other recommended fabrics, but I find that shorts made of ponte make me feel too hot and sweaty.  I love making my shorts out of Supplex.  It’s moisture wicking, so it really helps keep you cool.  And since it washes and wears so well, you don’t have to worry about using white Supplex to make shorts (or anything else for that matter!)  Because I love the consistently high quality, I buy all of my Supplex from Phee Fabrics.  It is a substantial 18oz., so I never have to worry about it being sheer.  And, it took less than a yard of fabric for my shorts.

Place the pocket facing on the pocket opening right sides together, stitch, then flip the facing to the inside of the pocket.  Give it a good press, then topstitch.  The photo below shows what the facing will look like on the inside (or wrong) side.

Z pocket

Place the pocket right side up, to the wrong side of the shorts front, lining up the top and sides.  Baste at the top and side seam, and pin the curved inner edge of the pocket to the front.

Z pocket baste

Use a zig zag, decorative stitch, or cover stitch to sew the pocket to the front.  I used one of the “overlock” stitches on my sewing machine.  Take your time sewing around the curve to make sure you are catching the pocket as you sew.  Press everything smooth.  From this point you’ll be able follow the pattern directions as written to finish your shorts or pants.
Zen back

I like the idea of the back yoke/waistband on the Zen Pants, because it curves down to meet the pockets at the side seams and gives your shorts or pants a flattering shaped look.  It does however take longer to sew than a simple rectangular or a contoured waistband that’s even along the bottom edge.  I also like that the pattern tutorial gives you photos, drawings, and tips for some common pants fitting issues.  I may try to scoop out the back crotch curve of my shorts a little to fit the shape of my bum.  This should correct the wrinkles I seem to get on all pants patterns, (so I know that it’s my body shape, versus an issue with patterns.)

I love being able to make cute, comfortable shorts that will help keep me cool during the heat of summer.  It’s nice to be able to customize them to suit me by choosing from all the pattern options and by a simple hack for the pockets.

 
Zen shorts

Now I need to search through my patterns to see what else I need to make!

 

*This post may contain affiliate links.  This means that at no extra cost to you, I may receive a small commission if you purchase through my links.  As always, I only give my honest opinion.  After all, it is my blog, which represents me!  Thank you for reading and sharing my love of sewing and pattern hacking. 😉