Shorts Or Swim Trunks? How About Both!

Sewing For Men, Episode 3

My husband isn’t often interested in patterns, or in being my model for a pattern test. 🙂  He did however, really like the line drawings for the new GreenStyle Motion Athletic Shorts.  Since he basically lives in athletic shorts, he was more than happy to let me sew them for him!

The Motion Shorts are designed for stretch wovens, with an optional liner layer made in 4-way stretch fabric.  The front pockets are deep and large, so no matter how big your phone, there’s plenty of room for that, and all the other stuff guys tend to carry!  The curved back gives shaping and is quite flattering on the booty.  And the side and back panels give an opportunity for contrast fabric and pretty top-stitching.

Motion back

The liner layer can be made of mesh for a traditional swim trunk style, or Supplex or other compressive fabric for support for working out.  I chose to use nylon/spandex tricot so Dan can wear his shorts for workouts and swimming.  Moisture wicking, quick drying fabric is key when making swim or workout wear.  I use the same Phee Fabrics tricot for my swimwear and dresses, and he’s lucky I had this khaki steel color in my stash and used it for him, rather than the dress I had intended to make with it! 😉

Motion lining

After I made the first pair of shorts, he requested that I add a “hammock hack” to the liner layer, so that they would fit like ready-to-wear Saxx, and all the underwear I make for him.  No problem sweetie, I can do that! ❤  Powernet is the fabric of choice for the gusset hammock, just as it is added to bras and swimwear, because of its supportive nature.

The hammock is a partial moon shape, with the straight edges toward the center, and the curved edges sewn to the center panel of the liner layer.  After cutting out the mirror image hammock pieces, I do a tight rolled hem on the straighter side of both pieces.  If you don’t have a serger, you can also use cotton swimwear elastic tautly stretched and zig-zag stitched to the straighter edges.  Lay the hammock pieces on the lining center panel and pin along the curved edge.  Then baste along the sides and across the top with a zig zag stitch set at 2.5 or 3.0.  Then stitch the dart at the bottom of the center panel.  Snip the top of the dart up to, but not through the stitch line, and press the seam open.  Then baste it in place.  Notice how having a larger curve on the hammock piece, compared to the curve on the center panel gives the wearer space to tuck everything in?  (I’m trying hard here to be descriptive without being too descriptive if you know what I mean!)  This is a family friendly blog!

Motion gusset

At this point, the center panel can be sewn to the liner pieces as per the pattern tutorial, and the shorts can be completed.  Here’s a photo of the inside of the finished shorts.

Motion gusset complete

The pattern has options for 5″, 7″, and 9″ inseam lengths, which is great because they can be customized to fit your needs.  Dan prefers the 7″ inseam, because he doesn’t like longer shorts that get caught on his knees when he’s working out.  If I were making myself a pair, I’d choose the 5″ length.  And yes, I tried his shorts on.  I’d need a smaller size, but they were pretty cute on me too!  The pockets are so much bigger than any other shorts I’ve made, so who wouldn’t want that?

Motion pocket

They are flattering from every angle, and I am so excited that the beach has reopened so we can go for walks along the shore again.

Motion right side

And no photo session with a guy is complete without plenty of silly poses for your viewing pleasure! 😉

Motion guns Motion buff

Obviously I need to make him a few more pairs, because he is loving the look!

I used stretch twill from Phee Fabrics as the main fabric, with a scrap of (no longer available) reflective chevron as a fun accent.  It’s funny how making them out of all one fabric color gives them a dressy look, while using an accent fabric gives them a more sporty look.  And I know that I’ve found a winning pattern when he starts asking me to customize and hack it for him! 🙂

 

This post may contain affiliate links.  This means that at no extra cost to you, I may receive a small commission if you purchase through my link.  As always, I only give my honest opinion.  After all, it is my blog, which represents me! 🙂  Thank you for reading and sharing my love of sewing, fabric, patterns, and pattern hacking. ❤

 

 

Keep It Simple & Add Some Flair

Keeping it simple sounds like a great idea right about now, during a time of uncertainty.  And I (mostly) have been!  My days are filled with sewing, cooking, cleaning, spending time with my husband, prayer and reflection, and texting and FaceTiming family.  Like most people, I also probably spend too much time reading about the virus, watching TV, and on social media. 😦  So it’s time to get back to writing about sewing and patterns and fabric and all the other things that make me happy! 🙂

There were some chilly days here in Florida last month, so I decided to make the Pattern Emporium Keep It Simple Babe Tee shirt.  Patterns with lots of options can be overwhelming and wonderfully useful!  The Keep It Simple Babe has high and low square necks, high and low round necks, boat and crew necks, turtlenecks, and a V-neck.  And everything from cap to long sleeves, so there are definitely options.

Since Florida is hot most of the year, tank tops make up a good portion of my wardrobe.  But there are chilly days, so a long sleeved tee is a practical make.  Super soft rayon spandex is my favorite fabric for tops and flowy dresses, and I had enough of this turquoise from Phee Fabrics in my stash to make the long sleeved tee.  The sleeves are slim enough to stay in place when pushed up to 3/4 length, but not feel too tight.

KISB Urban front

The V-neck is a good depth, not too high or too deep, and the neck-band came out perfectly.  The bodice skims over the body and doesn’t cling or show off the fact that I’ve probably eaten too many cookies while staying “safer at home”!  The Keep It Simple is a solid pattern choice.  Now for the Flair!

I had a small bit of Cozy French Terry left after sewing some fuzzy slipper socks for my sister, and managed to squeeze a pair of shorts on the fabric.  The Pattern Emporium Urban Flair Pants are one of my favorite pants patterns.  There are three leg width options and I chose the wide leg version to make a pair of basic black pants a couple months ago.  I love them!  They are super comfortable, the back darts smooth over the booty, and other than adding length I didn’t need to alter the pattern at all!  If you’ve ever sewn pants, that is saying something!

Urban Flair pants

So that’s why I decided to use the pattern to make a pair of shorts.  I marked the pattern to give me a 5-1/4″ inseam, and cut the legs straight across.  Since I was using scraps, I had to cut the pockets out of rayon spandex, and used Supplex and the rayon spandex for the waistband.  Supplex makes great waistbands, because it has excellent recovery.  So instead of folding the waistband pattern piece in half, I hacked it to have an inner waistband of Supplex, and an outer waistband of rayon spandex, so it would match the pockets.  I slightly contoured it, and added a seam allowance so that the finished waistband would be the same height as the pattern called for.

waistband

It’s a fun accent, and worked out great.  I will say that it’s imperative to use a substantial weight of rayon spandex.  Flimsy rayon spandex won’t hold the weight of your phone and will get stretched out of shape.  This is 13oz. rayon spandex, the same as I used for my tee.  My phone easily fits in the generously sized pockets, and the shorts are super comfortable.

KISB Urban pocket

More shorts are definitely on the agenda, along with more walks along the beach!

KISB Urban side

Both patterns were great additions to my collection, and I’m glad I bought and made (more of) them.  I hope that you are doing lots of sewing, and enjoying spending time communicating with the people you love.  So keep it simple, give yourself some grace, and don’t forget to add a bit of flair and fun to your life! ❤

 

Chelsea Pants Make Cute Shorts!

I wouldn’t normally start off a blogpost with a photo of my booty, but when you’re talking about a pants pattern, one of the biggest questions people have is, “Will it make my booty look good?”  Um, yeah! 😉  So, let’s talk about the above photo.  My husband has the thrilling task of taking photos of me in my sewing creations.  If you think it’s awkward standing on a public beach (where a good portion of the photos get taken) and trying to model without laughing at the absurdity of it, and trying to not look like a total doofus in every photo, can you imagine having to be the photographer?

“I need close, full body shots of the front, side, and back.”  “I need the light shining on the clothes so that you can see the details.”  “Can you get a close-up of the pockets (or straps, or whatever detail is important about said garment)?”  “Are my fat rolls showing too much?”  “Make sure I don’t have any weird wrinkles.”  “Is my hem nice and straight?”  You get the picture.  He puts up with my requests and awkward silliness while posing, and hurries to snap some photos before people walk, run, or swim into the frame.

He had already taken some photos of my Chelsea shorts earlier in the morning, and I kept my comfy shorts on when we went to hang out in a nearby city.  I wanted a better detail shot of the jeans style pockets I used, and the hedge and brick fence along a shady sidewalk looked like a good spot to take photos.  Being the good sport he is, he was more than happy to crouch down on a public city sidewalk to take a few photos of my booty!  The dog walkers and random passers-by probably thought we were a little weird, but, those are the lengths we go to for good photos!

The GreenStyle Chelsea Pants are a cute, on-trend pattern.  The legs have a nice flare at the bottom, and with bell bottoms rolling back into style again, they are a good way to ease into the look.  I am old enough to recall bell bottoms being “cool” during my childhood.  And for someone who is not quite ready to embrace the full bell trend, a nice flared pant is a great look.  If it were cold here, or rather, stayed cold here for longer than two weeks in January, a few pairs of Chelsea pants in Supplex would be the perfect addition to your work and play wardrobe.  They’ve got a seam down the center front of the legs, which gives them a slimming look.

Chelsea STS front

The pattern includes a fancy two-piece pocket design, but I decided to make a simple jeans style pocket as it works better for my phone.  You’ve heard me comment on the wonders of Wash Away Wonder Tape before, and let me tell you, pockets are another great place to use it.  In the past I’ve measured, pinned, pressed, and basted the edges of my pockets under so that I could place them on my pants.  Now I measure, lightly pin, press, then put a strip of Wonder Tape in the pressed crease.  The pockets stay perfectly straight, with no possibility of getting twisted or pulled out of shape when you sew them on.  As my Dad used to say, “Having the right tools makes the job a whole lot easier.”  Wash Away Wonder Tape is a handy “tool” to have in your sewing box.

It was easy to hack the pants pattern into shorts.  I knew I wanted a 6″ inseam, which is short enough, but not too short on my long legs.  So I marked my front and back pattern pieces 7-3/8″ down from the crotch points, which gave me the 6″ inseam, an inch hem, and the 3/8″ seam allowance.  Keeping my ruler parallel with the lengthen/shorten line assured an even hem.

Chelsea shorts length

Besides using a different pocket design and shortening the length, the only other alteration I made was adding to the crotch depth.  I have a bit of a booty, so extending the crotch point a little bit gives my pants a little more space where I need it, and keeps me from having a “wedgie”, which is never a good look!

The pattern tutorial is easy to follow, and the pants are a pretty quick sew.  I used Phee Fabrics circular knit for this pair, and the moisture wicking fabric kept me cool and comfortable while walking around on a 96*F day.

Chelsea STS sideSTS Chelsea back

The Studio To Street Top blogged here is a great transition piece for cooler mornings or chilly evenings, and I love the Deep-V back option.  This one is made out of circular knit, but you’d get a similar look by using Tricot.

I have three more Studio To Street Tops with long sleeves, all made out of Rayon SpandexRayon Spandex Ribbing and Cozy French Terry would be some other great fabric choices for this cozy top.  They are so soft and comfortable, and are a go-to for throwing on before heading out to yoga class in the fall and winter.  If it’s past tank top weather were you live, the Studio to Street is a great style to wear with your Chelsea’s whether you choose to make them shorts or pants length.

These are so comfortable I’m probably going to have to make a pair in Supplex.  You know, for that two weeks of “winter” we get here in Florida! 🙂

 

This post may contain affiliate links.  This means that at no extra cost to you, I may receive a small commission/credit if you purchase through my links.  As always, I only give my honest opinion.  After all, it is my blog, which represents me! 🙂  Thank you for reading and sharing my love of sewing, patterns, fabric, and pattern mashing and hacking. ❤

 

GreenStyle Warrior Pants

Made As Shorts, With Other Tips & Tricks

I’ve liked the look of the GreenStyle Warrior Pants ever since the pattern released.  But I don’t often wear pants, so I didn’t buy the pattern right away.  The idea of making them into shorts/culottes opened up some possibilities.  As did the available length of yardage in my stash! 🙂  Originally I considered making them in capri length, but there was no way the pattern would fit onto my available fabric.  So I folded up my pattern 6″ above the capri cut line, and decided to make them into shorts!

The pattern recommends lightweight stretch knit, so I knew that Phee Fabrics Rayon Spandex would give me the beautiful drape that is the hallmark of these pants.  The pattern has an integrated pocket design that is vital to the construction of the pants.  Since I love having pockets on everything, I was curious about the unique pocket technique.  It can seem a little confusing, but if you follow the pattern tutorial, you’ll be fine.

When pinning the pocket overlap, the tutorial suggests draping the pants over your ironing board to help keep everything flat and smooth.  My quilting ruler is a generous 8-1/2″ x 24″, so it was easier for me to slide my ruler inside the pants and not worry about accidentally pinning my pants to my ironing board cover!

I also employed a trick I first used while making the Sunday Cardigan, previously blogged here, and here.  Since I don’t have a serger, rather than “neatening the side edges” by serging or zig zagging, I cut out 3/8″ wide strips of lightweight interfacing using my rotary cutter and clear ruler.  Pressing these strips along the edges made it super easy to turn the edges under and topstitch later in the construction process.

Warrior inter

Since fuller or flowy pants and skirts look best with a fitted top, I wanted to avoid any possibility of a “muffin top” that you sometimes see when using elastic in a waistband.  Using a layer of techsheen (a more powerful version of powernet) worked perfectly!  Simply baste powernet or techsheen to the wrong side of the inner waistband, and treat it as one layer while following pattern instructions.  It will end up sandwiched between your inner and out waistband, and give your tummy a nice smoothing effect.

Warrior tech

I’m happy with my Warrior Pants (turned shorts or culottes, or whatever you want to call them!) and think that they work well with the Staple Tank.

Warrior sideWarrior back

Of course I had to twirl around in them because that’s what you do when wearing comfortable flowy bottoms!  I love that you can make the slit as high or low as you want.  I haven’t tried tying the bottom in a knot, but I think that might be a cute variation.

Warrior slit

These will be easy to throw on over a swimsuit when going to the beach, and are super comfortable for lounging or running errands.  They are a bit dressier than regular shorts, so they’d be appropriate when you want to be comfortable but need something a little bit more “put together” looking.  They are a fun addition to your wardrobe, and can easily transition into autumn and early winter, depending upon the length, and the fabric you choose.  The new Phee Fabrics Ribbed Knit, French Terry, and even Supplex would be fun fabrics to try.

 

*This post may contain affiliate links.  This means that at no extra cost to you, I may receive a small commission if you purchase through my links.  As always, I only give my honest opinion.  After all, it is my blog, which represents me!  Thank you for reading and sharing my love of sewing, patterns, fabric, and playing with patterns. 😉

Sewing For Men, Episode 2

GreenStyle Men’s Hampton Shorts

I don’t often sew for my husband, and that’s unfortunate.  Like most sewists, there are so many projects on my never-ending list, and so many patterns I’d like to try, that I don’t seem to get around to sewing for him very often.  When I showed him the GreenStyle Hampton Shorts pattern (on sale for $8.50 for the month of June 2019), he said, “I’ve been thinking about buying a couple pairs of shorts like that!”  So I knew that it was something that he wanted and would wear.  Then came the more challenging part- convincing him to let me photograph him wearing the shorts.  He knows that that is part of the deal.  He’s taken enough photos of me in my makes to know that I like to share what I sew, whether in a Facebook sewing group or on my blog.  Surprisingly, he agreed pretty quickly, so I knew he really wanted the shorts!

He wanted the shorts to fit like his favorite pair of RTW gym shorts.  So I measured his waist to choose a pattern size, and grabbed the shorts to compare to the pattern.  I noticed something interesting about the gym shorts- the back of the shorts was much larger than the front.  Unlike some men with a flat butt, my husband has a booty.  Hmmm… so perhaps that explains why he likes the fit of that particular pair of shorts.  (That, and the fact that they are a little bit shorter than the rest of his workout shorts.)  He also isn’t a fan of low rise pants or shorts.

Armed with this information, I traced out the pattern, with a few modifications.  His measurements put him in a size Large.  So I traced the back pattern piece in a size XL.  I traced the front pattern piece in a size Medium, but used the rise of the XL to keep them from being too low in the front.  Since this was an experiment, I used some old 2-way stretch cotton jersey that’s been in my stash forever.  Since most knit patterns nowadays call for 4-way stretch, my old 2-way stretch fabric has just been stashed in a drawer.

The pattern is easy, a front, a back, a waistband and pockets.  What makes it look nice is the top-stitching.  It always gives a garment a nice finished look.  Since the old jersey fabric had questionable recovery, I wanted to make sure that the pocket openings didn’t get stretched out and floppy.  So I cut a 1″ wide strip of interfacing and ironed it on to the edge of the pocket lining where the lining attaches to the shorts front.  To avoid any stretching, I made sure to stitch with the interfaced pocket linings up when sewing them to the pants fronts.  It worked perfectly, so I did a double row of topstitching to accent the pockets.  As per pattern directions, I also topstitched the side seams, which gives them a stylish, finished look.

Hampton tan pocket

The shorts sewed up pretty quickly.  I made buttonholes for the drawstring, sewed the elastic casing, and attached the waistband to the shorts.  My husband picked out the fun camouflage looking paracord to use as the drawstring.  I enlisted his help to melt the cut ends to keep them from fraying.

Hampton tan sideHampton tan back

Since my husband is not tall, I had taken an inch off the length when cutting out my pattern pieces.  They still ended up too long for his liking, so I cut off another inch and a half and hemmed them up.  The shorts were a success and looked good from every angle, so I knew I was good to go on making another pair.

I had some Twill Polartec Powerstretch left over from the Patterns for Pirates SOS pants I made for our daughter, blogpost here.  I knew it would give the shorts a dressier look, making them even more versatile.  The fabric is thicker, with a nice 4-way stretch.  To keep the pockets trim, I used a scrap piece of woven cotton for the pocket linings.  The blue coordinates well with the gray twill.  It is also my husbands favorite color, because, as he says, “It matches my eyes.” 😉

Hampton pocket lining

Since the cotton woven also stabilized the pocket, I didn’t bother with the interfacing at the pocket lining edge this time.  The shorts sewed up just as quickly, and obviously my husband loves them and had fun modeling for me. 🙂

Hampton gray muscles

Having used two completely different fabric types and weights, with stretch at the opposite ends of the spectrum, and getting great results each time, this pattern is a winner.  Having added to the rise, I would feel comfortable making it in a board short type fabric with only minimal stretch.

I really need to order some more Stretch Twill from Phee Fabrics and make him more Hampton Shorts.   Should I get charcoal, black, or more of the navy like I used for my tunic dress?  Father’s Day is right around the corner, and since he is a great Dad, he deserves some more cute and comfortable shorts!

 

*This post may contain affiliate links.  This means that at no extra cost to you, I may receive a small commission if you purchase through my links.  As always, I only give my honest opinion.  After all, it is my blog, which represents me!  Thank you for reading and sharing my love of sewing, patterns, and fabric. 🙂

5oo4 Zen Pants Made As Shorts

And An Internal Patch Pocket Hack

Summer time means shorts, and nothing screams summer like bright, white shorts.  They look great with any color tank or tee, or thrown on over a swimsuit.  In my quest to use every pattern in my collection I decided to try the 5 Out Of 4 Patterns Zen Pants, using the shorts cut line.  The Zen Pants are a slim fit with optional front and back patch pockets and a side cargo pocket.  There is also an optional faux fly, and drawstring waistband.

I like my shorts to be a smooth line under my tanks and wanted a dressy casual look, so I wanted to streamline as much as possible.  Pockets are an absolute necessity, so I decided to turn the large patch pockets into smaller internal patch pockets, and to forego any other ornamentation.  It’s fun to customize patterns to suit my needs, and I’m never afraid to try a simple hack.  As I have noted before, I don’t show full pattern pieces to protect designers intellectual property.

The first step of altering the pocket was to decide how wide I wanted it.  I laid my phone on the pattern pocket piece and knew that I could slim it down to the width of the X-small pocket.  I laid my traced out pants front piece onto the master pattern pocket and used a pencil to draw lines from the hip up and from the top out to the outer top corner.  I also curved the pocket side to follow the curve of the hip on the pants front.  I am pointing to this area in the photo below.  (The dashed line is the original pattern shape of the outer top corner of the pocket.)

Z pocket alter

Laying the pants front on the master pattern pocket piece allowed me to trace the curve to make the pocket opening on the pants front.  That small piece in the upper corner of the photo below is the piece I cut off and discarded.  I also hacked the pocket facing, (which is used to reinforce the pocket opening.)  I like my pocket facings to be about an inch wide, so I traced the top curve of the pocket facing piece and just made it an inch wide.

Z pocket fac

Next I laid out all my pattern pieces and cut them out my fabric.  You could use a ponte or one of the other recommended fabrics, but I find that shorts made of ponte make me feel too hot and sweaty.  I love making my shorts out of Supplex.  It’s moisture wicking, so it really helps keep you cool.  And since it washes and wears so well, you don’t have to worry about using white Supplex to make shorts (or anything else for that matter!)  Because I love the consistently high quality, I buy all of my Supplex from Phee Fabrics.  It is a substantial 18oz., so I never have to worry about it being sheer.  And, it took less than a yard of fabric for my shorts.

Place the pocket facing on the pocket opening right sides together, stitch, then flip the facing to the inside of the pocket.  Give it a good press, then topstitch.  The photo below shows what the facing will look like on the inside (or wrong) side.

Z pocket

Place the pocket right side up, to the wrong side of the shorts front, lining up the top and sides.  Baste at the top and side seam, and pin the curved inner edge of the pocket to the front.

Z pocket baste

Use a zig zag, decorative stitch, or cover stitch to sew the pocket to the front.  I used one of the “overlock” stitches on my sewing machine.  Take your time sewing around the curve to make sure you are catching the pocket as you sew.  Press everything smooth.  From this point you’ll be able follow the pattern directions as written to finish your shorts or pants.
Zen back

I like the idea of the back yoke/waistband on the Zen Pants, because it curves down to meet the pockets at the side seams and gives your shorts or pants a flattering shaped look.  It does however take longer to sew than a simple rectangular or a contoured waistband that’s even along the bottom edge.  I also like that the pattern tutorial gives you photos, drawings, and tips for some common pants fitting issues.  I may try to scoop out the back crotch curve of my shorts a little to fit the shape of my bum.  This should correct the wrinkles I seem to get on all pants patterns, (so I know that it’s my body shape, versus an issue with patterns.)

I love being able to make cute, comfortable shorts that will help keep me cool during the heat of summer.  It’s nice to be able to customize them to suit me by choosing from all the pattern options and by a simple hack for the pockets.

 
Zen shorts

Now I need to search through my patterns to see what else I need to make!

 

*This post may contain affiliate links.  This means that at no extra cost to you, I may receive a small commission if you purchase through my links.  As always, I only give my honest opinion.  After all, it is my blog, which represents me!  Thank you for reading and sharing my love of sewing and pattern hacking. 😉

Pace Skirt

Tips For Pretty Pleats

Like many (most?) sewists, I like looking through patterns, and thinking about new clothing I can add to my wardrobe.  I have eyed the GreenStyle Pace Skirt several times, and even when I’ve made bulk pattern purchases to get the discount, I’ve hesitated on the Pace Skirt because of the pleats.  Pleats may seem intimidating, but you really can sew pretty pleats!  I want to share some tips for making pleats, so you won’t be afraid to try this fun pattern. *update: the Pace Skirt is on sale for $8.50 for the month of April!*

The Pace Skirt has a plain front and pleated back, with optional attached briefs, or shorts with pockets! 🙂  Secret hidden pockets to carry your keys and phone?  Not having to worry that a big gust of wind will come along, or that you’ll have to perform some kind of quick un-lady-like move while chasing a little one around?  Sign me up please!

The pattern is drafted for a stretch woven skirt, with a stretch knit waistband and briefs/shorts.  Since it can be challenging to find a stretch woven fabric, GreenStyle has a note in the directions that you can use a stretch knit by sizing the skirt portion down a size.  I have learned to trust the extensive testing and excellent pattern drafting, follow my measurements, and make the recommended sizes.  I like to print and tape a master copy of my patterns and trace out my size on waxed paper.  That way I’ve always got my master pattern to go back to, even if my pattern pieces get torn or a bit crinkled up from use.

So here is my first tip: pay attention when you are tracing your pattern pieces.  Because I was using a stretch knit, I had to remember to trace a smaller size for the skirt front, back, and upper back pieces, while using my measured size for the waistband and shorts pieces.  This is also the time to lengthen or shorten the pattern pieces as needed.  I am tall, so I added 1-3/8″ to the skirt length.  I also used the high rise waistband pieces rather than the standard pieces.  Can I just add here that I love that both rises are included in the pattern?  I didn’t have to worry about adjusting the pattern to add to the rise, and those that prefer a shorter rise also have the appropriate pattern pieces.

Tip #2: Make sure that you are laying out your pattern perfectly on the grain.  Grainlines and direction of greatest stretch lines are included on patterns for a very important reason.  They help you line up the pattern with the fabric so that your garment will hang properly on the body.  This is super important on the skirt back piece, because you will want to reference the grainline when pressing your pleats.  If you cut it out on grain, it will make it so much easier to get perfect pleats.  If you cut it out crooked, you will get crooked pleats if you follow the grainline while pressing.

Tip #3: Mark the pleat lines on the skirt back.  The pattern piece is clearly marked with how to fold your pleats, so they go from the center outwards.  You could use tracing paper or a disappearing pen, but I found it easy enough to use pins and clips.  I placed pins along the top of the skirt at the pleat marks.  And where each pleat folded over, and the next pleat started, I also added a clip.  That was my reminder of where the pleat ended.  In the photo below, I’ve already pressed all the pleats on the right outward toward the right side of the skirt.  (I used the metal hem guides to help hold my pleats in place while I made the folds to pleat the other half of the skirt back.  You could also just use pins or clips to accomplish this.)  Since I had made sure that I cut my pattern piece on the grainline, it was easy to follow the grainline to press the entire length of the pleat down to the hemline.  And obviously, I need to clean my iron, because little white specks of build-up have flaked out of the steam ports! 🙂

pace pinned

Tip #4: When pattern directions suggest that you baste, take the time to baste!  The small amount of time that it takes to baste, will save you so much more time when you are sewing your pieces together.  Once all of your pleats are pressed, pin them in place so that you can baste them down before sewing on the upper back piece.  Check out those pretty, pressed pleats!

pace pleats

By following the pattern directions, you will end up with a fun, flirty, pleated skirt!  It can be casual everyday wear when paired with a simple tank top.  In this case, a rayon spandex GreenStyle Staple Tank.

pace sidepace back

You can use the built-in briefs option if you prefer it when playing tennis or golf.  If you’re like me and want pockets to hold your stuff while power-walking, I recommend the shorts.  I love the “secret” pockets!

pace pocket

I also love that you can change the vibe and wear the Pace Skirt for dressier occasions  by wearing a chiffon top, or adding a jacket or cardigan.  This RTW top had been languishing in my closet because I didn’t really have anything to wear it with.

pace black

I am very happy with my new skirt.  My husband complimented me on it, and said that he loves the pleats.  ❤  Even with the built-in shorts, I don’t feel overheated because I used Phee Fabrics circular knit which is moisture-wicking and super comfortable.  There’s no need to feel intimidated by pleats.  If you have any questions about sewing or pleats, feel free to comment and I will try to help you out.  Take your time, use my tips, follow the pattern directions, and add some cute new skirts to your closet!

 

*This post may contain affiliate links.  This means that at no extra cost to you, I may receive a small commission if you purchase through my links.  As always, I only give my honest opinion.  After all, it is my blog, which represents me!  Thank you for reading and supporting my love of sewing!